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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)
and terrorism where boys and girls rarely get to play together, and music was banned under the taliban rule, but with help from the state department and the world bank and other supporters, these young afghan children are enjoying a rare moment of harmony here in the u.s. >> 13-year-old lala has been waiting two years for this moment. ♪ the chance to perform on the world stage while breaking snoer taliban tab your. girls and boys playing music together. >> which do you like better? the drums or the trumphet? which is more fun? >> the drum. >> the drums? >> she's one of 48 young musicians who attend the only music school in afghanistan where music was strictly banned under taliban rule. many in the group are orphaned by war. some even lived on the streets. today they are nearly 7,000 miles from home, bringing traditional sounds from their homeland. thn the tambore mixed with the western harmonies they are also learning. ♪ organizers hope the young musicians can learn about america and america can learn about afghanistan. music is making a comeback. >> should the future afghanistan show a
and the taliban. what on earth are we doing over there? why do we care about the hearts or minds or building the schools? i mean, outside of osama bin laden going to afghanistan and tricking the taliban into this spectacular attack on america, in general the muslims in afghanistan like the ones in indonesiaia have not exported terrorism. that's been the specialty of other countries. they really just want to be left alone so why don't we just leave them alone, as long as they're not plotting an attack on us, what is the point? >> michelle flournoy just laid out calmly four or five great ways to reduce the pentagon budget, including getting out of afghanistan, taking the civilian population in the d.o.d. down because we're leaving afghanistan. i thought it was pretty good, ann. somebody ought to listen to her. >> yes, i agree. i'm glad you brought up with her the base closings. this is why you seed something like a closure. the american people are of two find minds. they think government should be smaller, thinks government wants too. but the second you name a specific program that's going to
/11 commission as a, quote, an all-out secret effort to persuade the taliban to expel bin laden. now, as we know, bin laden was not expelled. three months later, the bin laden wrath was unleashed with the attack on our embassies. did you advise senator director tenet and national security adviser berger against this operation and if so why? >> i had conversation with george tenet at the time. but i must point out, senator, that every single cia manager, george tenet, his deputy, the head of the director of operations at the time, chief of the counterterrorism center argued against that operation, as well. because it was not well grounded in intelligence and it chance of success were minimal. minimal. and it was likely that other individuals were going to be kilned. and so, when i was involved in those discussions, i provided the director and others my programal advice of whether or not i thought that that operation should go forward. i also was engaged in discussions with saudi arabia government at the time and encouraged certain actions to be taken to put pressure on the taliban and bin laden.
. killing thousands of al qaeda and taliban, but more than 300 civilians, as well. a world away, in remote villages, you can hear them. like a distance, muted chain saw. a dull, but deadly roar. villagers describing it this way -- "the drones are all over my brain. i can't sleep. when they're hovering over us, we're all scared." a reality we seldom see, says stanley mcchrystal, the retired general who once ran the military's drone strike program. >> if the threshold gets too low and we are too casual about it, then we will forget how much scar tissue we build up in those countries. >> reporter: general mcchrystal believes that americans should have the opportunity to know more about these secret drone wars, to weigh those benefits and risks. that rare opportunity will occur tomorrow, when john brennan speaks. diane? >> it is going to be a very combustive day. thank you, martha raddatz. >>> and also today, a more trusted part of american life has succumbed to modern times. the postal service announced today that saturday delivery of letters will soon end in august. only packages will come t
of soldiers against hundreds of taliban and incredible odds. [ male announcer ] how do you measure happiness? by the armful? by the barrelful? the carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where, if you total your new car, we give you the money for a new one. call... to talk to an insurance expert about everything else that comes standard with our base auto policy. and if you get into
, obama administration lawyers argue the government can kill americans believed to be top taliban leaders posing, quote, an imminent threat of attack against the united states. >> we have acknowledged the united states that sometimes we use remotely piloted aircraft to conduct targeted strikes against specific al qaeda terrorists to prevent attacks on the united states and to save american lives. we conduct those strikes because they're necessary to mitigate ongoing actual threats, to stop plots, prevent future attacks and save american lives. the strikes are legal, ethical an wise. >> but as expected, the memo coming under fire from civil rights activists because of how broadly imminent threat is defined. quote, the condition that an operational leader present an imminent threat of violent attack against the united states does not require the united states to have clear evidence that a specific attack on u.s. persons and interests will take place in the immediate future. now, the memo also has new details on legal case behind more drone strikes against al qaeda suspects. such as a strike
decade, killing thousands of al-qaeda and taliban but more than 300 is civilians as well. a world away in remote villages you you can hear them like a distant muted chain saw. a dull but deadly roar. villagers describing it this way, the drones are all over my brain. i can't sleep when they are hovering over us we are all scared. a reality we seldom see says stanley mcchrystol. >> we will forget how much car tissue we build up in those countries. >> the general believes that americans should have the chance to know more about the secret drone wars to weigh those benefits and risks. theyville that opportunity on thursday when john brennan speaks. martha raddatz, abc news, jerusalem. >> at least four people thieved dead after yesterday's 8.0 earthquake off the solomon islands. it generated attune a tsunami o five feet tall and flooded the local airport. dozens of aftershocks now being felt. >>> to syria now. the capital city has not seen the scale of violence that has destroyed entire neighborhoods in cities like aleppo and holmes. the government has been keeping a tight grip it the city
, the taliban and associated forces in response to the 9/11 attacks and we may also use force consistent with our inherent right of national self-defense. there is nothing in international law that bans the use of remotely pilotted aircraft for this purpose or that prohibits us from using lethal force against our enemies outside of an active battlefield at least when the country involved con cents or is unwilling to take action against a threat. second, targeted strikes are ethical. without question, the ability to target a specific individual from hundreds or thousands of miles away raises profound questions. here, i think it is useful to consider such strikes against the basic principle of the law of war that govern the use of force. targeted strikes conform to the principle of necessity. requirement that the target has definite military value. in this armed conflict, individuals who are part of al qaeda or its associated forces are legitimate military targets. we have the authority to target them with lethal force, just as we target enemy leaders in past conflicts such as them and the
was part of a sting operation. he was a taliban supporter. >>> wondering where your tax refund is? the i.r.s. is way behind on giving people back their money. $122 billion behind. this time last year they issued 27 billion-dollar and this year, only more than 4 billion-dollar. the i.r.s. blames the fiscal cliff and late changes to the tax policy. >>> how would you like to go to college -- then have the school pay back your loan? that sounds good. that's what a small liberal arts school in michigan is doing. spring harbor school is reii am reimbursing students if they do not get a job after they graduate. they'll pay the loan until the student's income goes up or the loan repaid. i see a flaw in this. it's possible students won't be as motivated to look for a job. >> that's the greatest idea i've ever heard in my life. >> i was not expecting you to say that. >> are you kidding? i'm looking at four college tuitions. >> spring harbor. >> i love that. >> leon panetta is going to go away for a little bit. secretary of -- secretary clinton has gone away a little bit but the benghazi controvers
did after we drove the soviets out, but as a message to the taliban and neighbors that were not walking away either. >> you were around for the iraq war and around for much of the war in afghanistan, so i feel like you have a pretty good feel on what enough forces would be. is 3,000 too little? do you have any sense of that? >> i guess the way i would put it, just in stinctively, i think 3,000 is too little and 30,000 is too many. finding the goldilocks number. i think 30,000, i think it's too high in cost for us and in terms for the afghans themselves. more a political question than a military question. >> and finally, coming up to the state of the union. you know how this works, everybody wants to hear a certain thng, depending on which department you're in. from the point of view of the military and the world at large and america's place in it, what do you look for when the president gives this speech on tuesday? >> well, it's -- it's hard to say sort of off the top of my head. i think that clearly i would like to hear something about let's figure out a way to avoid the s
nato airstrike killed ten civilians including five children. reuters reports four taliban fighters also died there. president hamid karzai condemned that attack. nato is saying they are aware of the report of the civilian casualties but can't confirm them. many of the me and women who fought the nation's war have another battle on their hands. this time, correspondent douglas kennedy tells us, it's right here at home. >> 112 days. three other divisions hit at the same time. >> general macarthur fulfilled his pledge. >> in 1944, errol spent months fighting the japanese in world war ii. this is your uniform from the pacific, where you won a purple heart and a bronze star? >> yes, i did. >> tell me about that. >> well, we made a landing in new guinea. and that is where i got the bronze star. >> the former staff sergeant and his fellow american seasonals were successful at defeating the japanese. but for years he has been unsuccessful at defeating the bureaucracy at the veterans administration. the v.a. says it still cannot decide whether he can hold down a regular job. his daughter becky i
and that check is there. if congress does not want to wage war against the taliban, against whomever, they can cut off funding. >> thank you. >> i am a student at rutgers university. john mentioned the large majority of americans support giving the president the authority to kill american citizens without charges or trial or to process. my question is, if you were identified as a threat by some nameless official in the administration, where you want to process? >> the issue is not -- [applause] john: i don't think there would name him. they might name me. >> the issue is whether we are in a war situation, whether we are operating under the war powers of the constitution or whether we are in a law enforcement situation. the to have radically different approaches. we killed tens of thousands of american citizens, maybe hundreds of thousands with no due process in the civil war, and it was the right thing to do. [applause] john: on that note we're out of time. >> you want to discredit a movement, defend the confederacy. go ahead. john: ambassador bolton. no more time left. than
was banned for years by the taliban. now with help from the state department, the world bank and other supporters, these young afghan children are enjoying a rare moment of harmony. 13-year-old leila zhari has been waiting two years for this moment, the chance to perform on the world stage, while breaking another taliban taboo, girls and boys playing music together. which do you like better, the drums or the trumpet? which is more fun? >> the drums. >> reporter: the drums? she's one of 48 young musicians who attend the only music school in afghanistan. where music was strictly banned under taliban rule. many in the group are orphaned by war. some even lived on the streets. today they're nearly 7,000 miles from home, bringing traditional sound from their homeland. the tambor, meksed with western harmonies they're also learning. organizers hope the young musicians can learn about america and america can learn about afghanistan. music is making a comeback. >> the future of afghanistan, where the children of the country are, the future and that hope is not dead. >> reporter: how does it fe
. security officials say it's mostly controlled by militants affiliated with the taliban. seven kills, six injured. officials say no civilians were hurt in the strike. app to get a tow truck. it's gonna be 30 minutes. oh, so that means that we won't be stuck up here, for hours, with nothing to do. oh i get it, you wanna pass the time, huh. (holds up phone) fruit ninja!!! emergency roadside assistance. just a click away with the geico mobile app. i worked a patrol unit for 17 years in the city of baltimore. when i first started experiencing the pain, it's hard to describe because you have a numbness but yet you have the pain like thousands of needles sticking in your foot. it was progressively getting worse, and at that point, i knew i had to do something. when i went back to my health care professional, that's when she suggested the lyrica. once i started taking the lyrica, the pain started subsiding. [ male announcer ] it's known that diabetes damages nerves. lyrica is fda approved to treat diabetic nerve pain. lyrica is not for everyone. it may cause serious allergic reactions or suicida
're now going after midlevel al qaeda and midlevel taliban. where does that stop and who makes the decision that something is imminent? >> congressman ellison, you've been on this for some time. you want much more oversight from the congress. >> that's right. i looked into this. i haven't found one public hearing on drones. now, we had the brennan hearings but congress has the oversight responsibility here, and, by the way, the president has invited the conversation and said we need a legal architecture around this thing so why not do it. i don't think this is a partisan issue at all. i think we need to get a hold of this technology because other countries will be weaponizing drones. certainly we will probably have objections to how they use them if they don't use them in accordance to due process and international standards. and, by the way, the paper that the president -- well, the administration released uses the term "imminent threat." >> and who decides that, right? >> well, this is the broadest use of the term imminent i've ever. >> al qaeda. >> if you're a member of al q
, and as margaret follows there's a lot of diplomacy going on in secret now to see if you can bring the taliban into real peace negotiations so that we would leave with something like a settlement. we could say "here look, we're leaving but there's an agreement among these factions." >> schieffer: and you just had the president of afghanistan karzai saying he's going to forbid any more american airstrikes. he won't allow his own people to call in airstrikes because a recent one took some civilian lives. >> reporter: concern about hitting civilian areas. that's right. i think one of the other offshoots of this drop-down will be a continued presence in some form is where those asset goes. and the theory keeps getting floated what leaves afghanistan may go to the benefit of forces in within africa because of this new threat that has come to the fore and really been highlighted in terms of aqim, their presence in libya and algeria as we saw with the hostage crisis that just happened. but what that means is it's certainly not boots on the ground. it's just assets -- >> schieffer: the president didn'
against the taliban, against whomever, they can cut off funding. >> thank you. >> i am a student at rutgers university. john mentioned the large majority of americans support giving the president the authority to kill american citizens without charges or trial or to process. my question is, if you were identified as a threat by some nameless official in the administration, where you want to process? >> the issue is not -- [applause] john: i don't think there would name him. they might name me. >> the issue is whether we are in a war situation, whether we are operating under the war powers of the constitution or whether we are in a law enforcement situation. the to have radically different approaches. we killed tens of thousands of american citizens, maybe hundreds of thousands with no due process in the civil war, and it was the right thing to do. [applause] john: on that note we're out of time. >> you want to discredit a movement, defend the confederacy. go ahead. john: ambassador bolton. no more time left. thank you for joining us and taking these difficult questions. students,
killed some high-level al-qaeda or some high-level taliban, it is not justified in the overall sense of are we safer as a nation. i would say we're far less safe as a nation and that's one of the reasons i think if they were a rational congress, they would be rejecting john brennan. >> john: i think it will be a timely hearing this week. scott, is the administration going down the same road as the bush administration did by keeping this secret? shouldn't the public understand what the administration is up to when it kills an american citizen who hasn't actually been charged with a crime under a president who is a constitutional scholar no less? >> exactly. i think the secrecy issue is ultimately a bigger issue than the underlying legal interpretation and question the presidential authority because the notion that the administration can have a secret understanding of the law what the law is and how it applies is really offensive. our nation was founded on the notion that the law is for all to know and when the administration adopts a legal view, that's to be checked. on your direct qu
reading -- pakistani schoolgirl attacked by the taliban last year has undergone successful surgery to repair her skull. malala yousafza was left seriously wounded when militants shot her in the head for campaigning for the rights of girls. shortly before her operation, she announced the creation of a new foundation to advocate for children. >> today you can see that i am alive. i can see. i can see you. i concede everyone. today, i can see and i'm getting better day by day. it is because of the prayer's of people. because of the people, men, women, children -- all of them have prayed for me. because of these prayers' and because of these prayers, god has given me this new life. this is the second line. i want to serve the people. i want everyone, every girl, every child to be educated. we have organized by fund. >> those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with aaron matÉ. >> welcome to all our listeners and viewers from around the country and around the world. 10 years ago this week, a defining moment oc
. >> there was an interesting story. >> in yemen. >> he was -- he agreed to meet with a member of the taliban which was a very brave thing for him to do. al-qaeda. it was a brave thing for him to do. while they were meeting, they were voiprized by a drone. shocking story. a muss let me [delete]cleric on our side who had preached did the dangers of al-qaeda. and warning people not to be affiliated with them. he, himself, is blown away by a drone strike. >> one of the problems of remote control room warfare, you don't know exactly who you are killing. >> jay carney yesterday also made the point that, yes, we have the authorization, as does this -- the white paper, 16 pages, this authorization to conduct drone strikes exists under the blanket authorization for the war on terror that was given george w. bush by the congress right after september 11th. >> uh-huh >> bill: it's the same authorization that was cited by george bush to justify rendition, torture waterboarding, and wiretapping. >> right and also done in great sec res see. people kept asking carney about t
at the bottom of three steep mountains woke up to an overwhelming attack by the taliban, very smart attack, up to 400 taliban fighters and it seemed impossible and i asked clint rome romechier on monday who is going to be award the the medal of honor, what it was like to face these impossible odds. throughout all of this, did you ever think this is it? i'm not going to get out of here. >> it's like a fighter going into the boxing ring, you know, if you think you're going to lose before you even step into the ring, you've already lost. you're there to win, you're there to fight, you're there to, you know, your brothers to your left and right are depending on you so you don't have that in you. >> when you talk about an overwhelming force describe to me what overwhelming is. >> it's the kind of thing where every time they opened a door to run out to deliver ammunition, a sniper would pick one of them off. there were five guys trapped in a humvee for hours, three men trapped in the mortar pit for hours. the first guy killed was running to a machine gun in the corner of the camp to return fire, kil
ultimately were teaming with taliban fighters, so we talked about that in a special that will air at 10:00 tonight. >>> combat outpost keating was built in 006 with so many troops and assets deployed to iraq, those in afghanistan had to make do. one part of the strategy was to build small outposts as the u.s. pushed into eastern afghanistan. the location was a trap evident from the moment the uniate rrived in may 2009. what was your first reaction? >> first reaction was i think the same as everybody that stepped foot on that, this is a pretty indefensible spot. >> i thought we were supposed to be on top of a mountain. this is crazy. i mean, that's how i felt, you know. shooting up? but you just, i was there, you know, i can't be like this is stupid. >> reporter: this say part of the called the hindu kush mountain range you're either on or in a valley. in order to be near the local population and near the road combat outpost keating was put at the bottom of three steep mountains. ♪ soldiers had been fatally attacked there before. in 2007, private chris pfeiffer, in 2008, camp commander
know of. >> against american citizens. there are an awful lot against the taliban. we are the only guise with drones now. that will not last forever. what happens when other count there's get drones? do they takeout an american ambassador driving a car in saudi arabia? you could even see drone attacks in the united states. i worry about the precedent, the generation that we're creating of people who are really going to hate america and i worry about loring the bar so we make it much too easy to pull that trigger and go to war when we don't have anything at risk. martha: we basically had heard that the war on terror was over in many ways, and yet it has been carried on in a way that may perpetuate it if you're right. kt thank you so much for being with us. always great to talk to you. >> thanks. gregg: we are just getting word of a shooting in ben srer denver, colorado now. several people including children have been killed or injured. we just don't know yet. there is a heavy police presence at a home in denver, and witnesses say they saw a child being brought out on a stretch tore
afghan communities to defend against taliban intimidation and violence. plans are being developed to increase the authorized size of the program from 30,000 down to 45,000. the next commander will also play an important role in shaping our partnership with afghanistan after 2014. a partnership that i fully support. i am concerned however by plans to reduce the afghan national security forces by a third starting in 2015. of retreated 52,000 to two injured 30,000 by 2017. i believe any future reductions in the size of the afghan forces should be based on security conditions in afghanistan at that time and as afghan security forces' progress in providing for their country's security, we should reassure them that we will continue to support these efforts by citing as we withdraw our forces that there won't be a drawdown in afghanistan forces. progress in afghanistan remains fragile, significant challenges to afghanistan's long-term stability remains. among the greatest threat to the stability is the safe havens for the afghan insurgents across the pakistan border which the government
three kids. in october everything change would. a predawn ambush in the pakistan border. 300 taliban stormed the base where 50 american soldiers became sitting ducks in a valley surrounded by mountains owned by the income. >> what happened next is one of the most intense battles of the entire war in stanford. the attackers had the advantage and high grounds and mountains above and unleashing everything they h. >> the sergeant and others jumped from their bids and he managed to call in air support that killed 30 insurgent. rockit grenad explode cent chap nel in his hip and arm and neck. came within 10 feet. >> they charged and they kept 50 meters and 80s and 100 meter run through a hail of bullets . they reached their fallen frinds and they brought them hoim. >> staff sergeant clint romesha is a reb luctant hero. >> this awarted is for the eight soldiers that didn't make it and the rift of the team that fought valiently and magnif stently that day. >> their parents were at the white house for the medal of honor ceremony. his fellow soldiers would follow staff sergeant roimsha to hell
afghan united states operation targeting taliban fighters in the northeast part of the country. >> the united states and russia are coming together to try to find a resolution to the ongoing crisis in syria. secretary of state john kerry speaking today with russia's foreign minister on the phone about the best way to use their respective influence to end the bloodshed. and now live to jerusalem and this is an important move on of behalf of russia, and the united states? >>reporter: russia is syria's biggest backer and john kerry spoke to the russian foreign minister after trying to reach the russian foreign minister but nothing particularly concrete came out of this discussion only a promise to meet face to face in the future. the fighting is et cetera can -- is escalating in aleppo with opposition fighters stepping up attacks on airbases capturing two regime airports. assad troops have responded by shelling several rebel-held areas and the u.n. is trying to make another push to open up talks between opposition groups and the syrian government. both sides have refused to talk t
. but the public report came out on september 28. and in that report it said that local taliban was working with war lords to provide guards and weapons for use in the contract. it came out they were failing to adequately investigate the forwards' previous employment which resulted in hiring individuals who had been fired for sharing sensitive information, security information work taliban war lords. failure to appropriately vet guards, some of whom, according to u.s. intelligence reports, may have been involved in anti-american activities. now all of that information was out in the classified way several weeks before september 10, excuse me, september 28, an was out in public september 28.
out secret effort to persuade the taliban to expel bin laden. as we know, bin laden was not expelled. three months later, his wrath was unleashed with an attack on our embassies. did you advise director tenant against this operation? and if so, why? >> i had a conversation with george and that at the time. every single cia manager, george tennant as deputy director of operations at the time, and other individuals at the counter-terrorism center argued against that operation as well because it was not well grounded in intelligence, and its chances of success were minimal. and it was likely that other individuals would be killed. when i was involved in those discussions, i provided the director and others my professional advice about whether i thought that operation should go forward. i also was engaged in discussion with the saudi government at the time. and i encouraged certain action to be taken to put pressure on the taliban as well as bin laden. >> i take it that your answer to my question is that you did advise in favor of the cancellation of that operation. >> based on what i ha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)